DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

The United States of America is a federal republic that has had independence at the forefront since its inception. Originally occupied by Britain’s citizens in the North American Thirteen Colonies, this independence was later accomplished on July 4th, 1776, with the signing of the Declaration of Independence from British rule. The present government structure in the United States that has an executive, bi-cameral legislative, and judicial branch, was established through the 1789 American Constitution. Since the ratification of the American Constitution, the United States has been amended to end slavery, ban discrimination, and solidify the right of women to vote.  This Constitution, along with the American Revolution is essentially the criterion in which America views justice, democracy, and freedom transnationally and specifically within the United Nations.

 

Although intrinsically US views seem peaceful, the country has been involved in many a war. The Civil War, fought in 1861-65, was a plight in union preservation, and was the result of uncompromising differences between Northern and Southern American states regarding the prohibition of slavery. From this internal conflict, one can begin to comprehend the origins of the democratic movement within the nation. A key example of more current American views, however, is illustrated in World War I and World War II. Prior to these conflicts, the US was neutral in European military affairs. After American vessels were targeted along with an attack on Pearl Harbor, the US proved its commitment to maintain national security from foreign actors.

 

 As on of the five victors of World War II, the United States secured a permanent member of the United Nations Security Council in October of 1945. With a priority on the maintenance of peace and tranquility, the United States has played an integral role in organizing negotiations globally and most notably between Russia and the United Kingdom. This power creates and underlines the incentive of America to provide and aid developing nations with an emphasis on democratic governing.

 

Economically speaking, The United States was the catalyst for the first stable international market. In July of 1944, the United Nations met at the Bretton Woods Conference to form an agreement on how allied nations would accurately pay off war debts between borders. These meetings subsequently established several organizations such as the World Trade Organization and the World Bank, which are currently part of an effort to fiscally provide for developing nations, as well as increase international trading. With the United States being the largest shareholder of the World Bank, operations in education, infrastructure, agriculture, and as well economic and social development have only continued to flourish.

 

 

 

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.